Polskie Radio / Polish Radio

Tonight, my piece ‘We Lived in the Gaps Between the Stories.’, performed by accordionist Ryszard Lubieniecki, will be played on Polish radio:
[translation]: “[…] a presentation of the music of young generation composers gathered around the Łódź scene of Musica Privata. “Seeds” is the title of Ryszard Lubieniecki’s debut album. We will listen to works by Mateusz Śmigasiewicz and Alannah Marie today.”
To listen, click here.
The show will also feature other works. Below is some information you can also read here.
[translation]: In “Letni noce”, we will listen to a new album with the works of a renowned Polish composer of electronic music, entitled “Machines”. The album was made in the Experimental Studio of Polish Radio.
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(photo illustration) Photo: Gary Perkin / Shutterstock.com
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“Taśmoc” – a story about Eugeniusz Rudnik

Eugeniusz Rudnik is a respected Polish sound director, considered to be a pioneer of electronic music. He could fly anyone, even the most ordinary sound. A new album of the artist who died a few years ago has just been released. We will listen to her fragments in “Summer Night”.

There will also be another novelty: debut and at the same time a presentation of the music of young generation composers gathered around the Łódź scene of Musica Privata. “Seeds” is the title of Ryszard Lubieniecki’s debut album. We will listen to works by Mateusz Śmigasiewicz and Alannah Marie today.

We will also remind about the 80th birthday anniversary of the Dutch composer, Louis Andriessen, who in the 1970s put a stick in an anthill and revolutionized the bloated scene of European contemporary music. We will listen to his famous Overture to Orpheus, as well as the musical essay “Du Materie”. Anna Petrini will play the piece “Crepuscolo” by Oscar Bianchi on the double-bass flute of Paetzold, whose new song will be announced at this year’s Warsaw Autumn festival.

Quote and pictures from: PolskieRadio.pl
Don’t forget to tune in!

New CD out now!

My piece ‘We Lived in the Gaps Between the Stories.’  written for amplified accordion is now available to buy on accordionist Ryszard Lubieniecki’s latest CD “SEEDS”!

CD cover of SEEDS performed by Ryszard Lubieniecki and featuring my piece ‘We Lived in the Gaps Between the Stories.’

You can preview the CD, and read more about it, here.

Below is some information about the CD which can also be read here.

“The title of Seeds, in addition to a reference to the composition of Josué Amador, in a certain way determines the material of the whole album. Ryszard Lubieniecki’s debut album includes six compositions for an accordion, amplified as various “seeds” representing different paths of musical avant-garde. From the strict algorithmic composition (Asterism), to the drone stretched to the limit (MAGMA2), the even percussive song (Metaphysical Graffiti), dense electronics (Ryszard (D) zik (i)), to compositions in which improvisation plays an important role ( Seeds and We lived in the gaps between the stories). All of them were created in close cooperation with the performer, who has an old, imperfect instrument, but on the other hand offers unique opportunities, especially in the field of percussion and noise sounds. By some artists, they have been used to the extent that their compositions are almost impossible to make on other accordions.”

Quote from: https://naszenagrania.bandcamp.com/album/seeds

 

Ian Pace in Huddersfield

I am pleased to announce that Ian Pace will be performing my Progress always comes late  (2017) for solo piano. This piece was composed as a birthday present for Ian Pace on his fiftieth birthday. More information about this can be found here and here.

This particular upcoming concert will feature works by Charles Ives, Walter Zimmermann, Marc Yeats, Lauren Redhead, Eleri Angharad Pound, Alistair Zaldua, and Michael Finnissy. More information about the concert and how to book can be found here.

The following is some information about the concert which can also be found on the University of Huddersfield’s website.

Internationally renowned pianist, musicologist and champion of avant-garde music Ian Pace presents an uncompromising recital, featuring a range of diverse new short works written in tribute for his 50th birthday, book-ended with two essays in extreme pianistic virtuosity from either end of the twentieth century – ‘Hawthorne’ from Charles Ives’ Concord sonata, and Michael Finnissy’s transcendental Piano Concerto No. 4.

• Charles Ives, ‘Hawthorne’ from Piano Sonata No. 2 “Concord, Mass., 1840-1860” (1916-19, rev. 1920s-40s) (10’)

• Walter Zimmermann, Stars for Ian (2017) (2’)

• Marc Yeats, exordium (2017) (3’)

• Lauren Redhead, nothing really changes (2017) (4’)

• Eleri Angharad Pound, pbh (2017-18) (2’)

• Alannah-Marie Halay, Progress always comes late (2017) (3’)

• Alistair Zaldua, Sylph Figures for Ian Pace (2017) (4’)

• Michael Finnissy, Piano Concerto No. 4 (1978, rev. 1996) (17’)

Below is a programme note about my piece:

Progress always comes late (2017) is a moment of nervous energy. There should be moments of calm and moments of frenzy juxtaposed in a schizophrenic manner, portraying an overall sensation of stopping and starting. This is a passionate piece and the performer must immerse themselves in every fragment equally, letting their mood and ‘spur-of-the-moment’ decisions dictate the order of fragments performed. The title (‘Progress always comes late’) is a quote from the 1988 film Cinema Paradiso, directed by Giuseppe Tornatore (the original Italian is something like ‘il progressi sempre tardi arriva’). This piece is a collection of fragments that can be performed in any order. The performer does not need to perform every single fragment on the page, although they are encouraged to. Individual fragments (or series of fragments) can be repeated if the performer wishes. Fragments do not need to be performed in their entirety if the moment calls for a fragment to be interrupted by another one. The duration of the piece and overall structure of the fragments is up to the performer (however, this can be devised by the composer should the performer prefer this).

New Publication!

I’m pleased to announce that another written publication is due to be released in July, 2019 in Exploring Xenakis: Performance, Practice, Philosophyed. by Alfia Nakipbekova (Wilmington, DE: Vernon Press, 2019).

The book includes chapters by other authors as follows: Alfia Nakipbekova (University of Leeds, UK), Dimitris Exarchos (Goldsmiths, University of London, UK) , Reinhold Friedl (Goldsmiths, University of London, UK) , Benoît Gibson (University of Évora, Portugal), Makis Solomos (Université Paris 8, France)

My chapter was co-written with critical theorist Michael D. Atkinson and it is titled ‘“Xenakis, not Gounod”: Xenakis, the Avant Garde, and May ’68’. This chapter is based on a talk we gave at the Xenakis Symposium.

Below is a summary of the whole multi-authored book, edited by Alfia Nakipbekova. The following quote can also be found here.

Considered to be one of the most revolutionary composers of the twentieth century, Iannis Xenakis pushed the boundaries of classical music. As a largely self-taught composer, Xenakis drew from his technical training in engineering and architecture to produce music that had the ability to both unnerve and enrapture his audiences. Motivated by his intense study of many scientific disciplines, he employed the mathematical rules of the natural world to test the traditional rules of counterpoint and harmony, and to explore the spatial texture of sound, colour and architecture. The Romanian-born Greek-French composer transformed twentieth century classical music for decades to come, leaving behind an undeniable legacy that continues to inspire and even shock listeners to this day. 

By approaching Xenakis’ creative output from a variety of perspectives, the contributors to this edited volume seek not only to situate Xenakis’s music within a larger cultural, social and political context but also to shed light on contemporary issues surrounding his work. Each chapter focuses on a different aspect of Xenakis’s music (in the context of particular works) and musical philosophy: mathematical, structural, performative, as well as the genesis of his compositional style and distinctive sound. Xenakis’s artistic presence on the contemporary music scene, his political influence during the tumultuous protests in Paris ’68, and his first piano composition, Herma, are also explored in-depth providing new insights into the life and work of this avant-garde figure. 

This book will appeal to contemporary music researchers, students and scholars and may also be of interest to artists, performers and composers, alike.

You can currently pre-order this book online.

Upcoming Performance: ENERGY CANNOT BE CREATED IV

The latest instalment in my ENERGY CANNOT BE CREATED collection will be premiered by LSTwo Ensemble on Saturday. ENERGY CANNOT BE CREATED IV: …generously taken explores the notion that all acts of composing involve (re)arranging what already exists. It generously takes, ruthlessly breaks apart, and forcefully reshapes. This piece is violent, cruel, and egotistic as it snaps and cracks the broken fragments of my musical self.

Alannah Marie

Alannah Marie, ENERGY CANNOT BE CREATED IV

More information about the upcoming concert is available here.

Recent Publication: Women & Music Journal

I’m pleased to announce that my latest article about one of my compositions ‘We Lived in the Gaps between the Stories.’  (2017) has been published in the latest ‘Women and Music’ journal (vol 22, 2018).

More information about this journal’s latest volume can be found here.

Women and Music Journal

Women and Music
A Journal of Gender and Culture
Edited by Emily Wilbourne

World Premiere: ENERGY CANNOT BE CREATED III

A piece I wrote earlier this year, ENERGY CANNOT BE CREATED III: transferred states, was premiered by LSTwo ensemble in Leeds last Friday (04.05.18).  The concert also featured world premieres from other composers.

A video recording of the concert can be found here.

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Snapshot from the premiere of ENERGY CANNOT BE CREATED III (composed earlier this year), performed by LSTwo.