Polskie Radio / Polish Radio

Tonight, my piece ‘We Lived in the Gaps Between the Stories.’, performed by accordionist Ryszard Lubieniecki, will be played on Polish radio:
[translation]: “[…] a presentation of the music of young generation composers gathered around the Łódź scene of Musica Privata. “Seeds” is the title of Ryszard Lubieniecki’s debut album. We will listen to works by Mateusz Śmigasiewicz and Alannah Marie today.”
To listen, click here.
The show will also feature other works. Below is some information you can also read here.
[translation]: In “Letni noce”, we will listen to a new album with the works of a renowned Polish composer of electronic music, entitled “Machines”. The album was made in the Experimental Studio of Polish Radio.
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(photo illustration) Photo: Gary Perkin / Shutterstock.com
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“Taśmoc” – a story about Eugeniusz Rudnik

Eugeniusz Rudnik is a respected Polish sound director, considered to be a pioneer of electronic music. He could fly anyone, even the most ordinary sound. A new album of the artist who died a few years ago has just been released. We will listen to her fragments in “Summer Night”.

There will also be another novelty: debut and at the same time a presentation of the music of young generation composers gathered around the Łódź scene of Musica Privata. “Seeds” is the title of Ryszard Lubieniecki’s debut album. We will listen to works by Mateusz Śmigasiewicz and Alannah Marie today.

We will also remind about the 80th birthday anniversary of the Dutch composer, Louis Andriessen, who in the 1970s put a stick in an anthill and revolutionized the bloated scene of European contemporary music. We will listen to his famous Overture to Orpheus, as well as the musical essay “Du Materie”. Anna Petrini will play the piece “Crepuscolo” by Oscar Bianchi on the double-bass flute of Paetzold, whose new song will be announced at this year’s Warsaw Autumn festival.

Quote and pictures from: PolskieRadio.pl
Don’t forget to tune in!

New CD out now!

My piece ‘We Lived in the Gaps Between the Stories.’  written for amplified accordion is now available to buy on accordionist Ryszard Lubieniecki’s latest CD “SEEDS”!

CD cover of SEEDS performed by Ryszard Lubieniecki and featuring my piece ‘We Lived in the Gaps Between the Stories.’

You can preview the CD, and read more about it, here.

Below is some information about the CD which can also be read here.

“The title of Seeds, in addition to a reference to the composition of Josué Amador, in a certain way determines the material of the whole album. Ryszard Lubieniecki’s debut album includes six compositions for an accordion, amplified as various “seeds” representing different paths of musical avant-garde. From the strict algorithmic composition (Asterism), to the drone stretched to the limit (MAGMA2), the even percussive song (Metaphysical Graffiti), dense electronics (Ryszard (D) zik (i)), to compositions in which improvisation plays an important role ( Seeds and We lived in the gaps between the stories). All of them were created in close cooperation with the performer, who has an old, imperfect instrument, but on the other hand offers unique opportunities, especially in the field of percussion and noise sounds. By some artists, they have been used to the extent that their compositions are almost impossible to make on other accordions.”

Quote from: https://naszenagrania.bandcamp.com/album/seeds

 

Ian Pace in Huddersfield

I am pleased to announce that Ian Pace will be performing my Progress always comes late  (2017) for solo piano. This piece was composed as a birthday present for Ian Pace on his fiftieth birthday. More information about this can be found here and here.

This particular upcoming concert will feature works by Charles Ives, Walter Zimmermann, Marc Yeats, Lauren Redhead, Eleri Angharad Pound, Alistair Zaldua, and Michael Finnissy. More information about the concert and how to book can be found here.

The following is some information about the concert which can also be found on the University of Huddersfield’s website.

Internationally renowned pianist, musicologist and champion of avant-garde music Ian Pace presents an uncompromising recital, featuring a range of diverse new short works written in tribute for his 50th birthday, book-ended with two essays in extreme pianistic virtuosity from either end of the twentieth century – ‘Hawthorne’ from Charles Ives’ Concord sonata, and Michael Finnissy’s transcendental Piano Concerto No. 4.

• Charles Ives, ‘Hawthorne’ from Piano Sonata No. 2 “Concord, Mass., 1840-1860” (1916-19, rev. 1920s-40s) (10’)

• Walter Zimmermann, Stars for Ian (2017) (2’)

• Marc Yeats, exordium (2017) (3’)

• Lauren Redhead, nothing really changes (2017) (4’)

• Eleri Angharad Pound, pbh (2017-18) (2’)

• Alannah-Marie Halay, Progress always comes late (2017) (3’)

• Alistair Zaldua, Sylph Figures for Ian Pace (2017) (4’)

• Michael Finnissy, Piano Concerto No. 4 (1978, rev. 1996) (17’)

Below is a programme note about my piece:

Progress always comes late (2017) is a moment of nervous energy. There should be moments of calm and moments of frenzy juxtaposed in a schizophrenic manner, portraying an overall sensation of stopping and starting. This is a passionate piece and the performer must immerse themselves in every fragment equally, letting their mood and ‘spur-of-the-moment’ decisions dictate the order of fragments performed. The title (‘Progress always comes late’) is a quote from the 1988 film Cinema Paradiso, directed by Giuseppe Tornatore (the original Italian is something like ‘il progressi sempre tardi arriva’). This piece is a collection of fragments that can be performed in any order. The performer does not need to perform every single fragment on the page, although they are encouraged to. Individual fragments (or series of fragments) can be repeated if the performer wishes. Fragments do not need to be performed in their entirety if the moment calls for a fragment to be interrupted by another one. The duration of the piece and overall structure of the fragments is up to the performer (however, this can be devised by the composer should the performer prefer this).

Upcoming Performance: ENERGY CANNOT BE CREATED IV

The latest instalment in my ENERGY CANNOT BE CREATED collection will be premiered by LSTwo Ensemble on Saturday. ENERGY CANNOT BE CREATED IV: …generously taken explores the notion that all acts of composing involve (re)arranging what already exists. It generously takes, ruthlessly breaks apart, and forcefully reshapes. This piece is violent, cruel, and egotistic as it snaps and cracks the broken fragments of my musical self.

Alannah Marie

Alannah Marie, ENERGY CANNOT BE CREATED IV

More information about the upcoming concert is available here.

World Premiere: ENERGY CANNOT BE CREATED III

A piece I wrote earlier this year, ENERGY CANNOT BE CREATED III: transferred states, was premiered by LSTwo ensemble in Leeds last Friday (04.05.18).  The concert also featured world premieres from other composers.

A video recording of the concert can be found here.

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Snapshot from the premiere of ENERGY CANNOT BE CREATED III (composed earlier this year), performed by LSTwo.

Upcoming Event: ‘Ian Pace at Fifty – Tributes and Early Modernism’

One of my recent pieces for piano, Progress always comes late (2017), will be premiered by pianist Ian Pace in April at City University of London. The event is free to attend, but it is recommended that you reserve a place via the online booking form.

To celebrate Ian Pace’s 50th birthday, a group of international composers have all written short piano pieces in tribute to him. These were collected by US composer Evan Johnson, who wrote that this collection was ‘in recognition of a career built around the persistent championing of young or unduly ignored composers, and of difficult or otherwise unreasonable music: the sort often thankless effort that can indelibly shape a nascent compositional career, build decades-long collaborations, and begin to change the face of a repertoire’. Eighteen world premieres will form one half of the concert, and in the other half Ian will perform four other lesser-known early twentieth-century piano works: Arthur Lourié’s sensuous and ultra-chromatic Deux poèmes op. 8 (1912), Stefan Wolpe’s brutalist Sonata for piano, op. 1 (1925), Frederic Mompou’s aloof Charmes (1920-21), and Roger Sessions’ lyrical and brilliant Piano Sonata No. 1 (1930).

Quotation source: City of London Music Events (city.ac.uk), ‘Ian Pace at Fifty – Tributes and Early Modernism’.  A concert programme can be found here.

The concert will also include performances of music by Arthur Lourié, Stefan Wolpe, Frederic Mompou, Roger Sessions, Christopher Fox, James Dillon, Roddy Hawkins, Lauren Redhead, Mic Spencer, Michael Finnissy, Sadie Harrison, Ben Smith, Patrícia Sucena de Almeida, Walter Zimmermann, Ian Pace, Jesse Ronneau, Eleri Angharad Pound, Marc Yeats, Nigel McBride, Alistair Zaldua, Wieland Hoban, and Evan Johnson.

Cellomondo CD #2: ‘Rebirth in Sound’

My piece Parallax Error (2014) for any four-stringed bowed instrument features as part of the second Cellomondo CD: Rebirth in Sound.

The CD also features music by Aurélio Edler-Copes, Ryszard Lubieniecki, Jason Post, Dugal McKinnon, Patiparn Jaikampan and Artyom Kim.

All pieces on the CD are performed by cellist Katharina Gross.

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The CD is available here and more information about it can be found here.  More information about Cellomondo can be found here.